Minnesota Department of Transportation

511 Travel Info

Historic Bridges

Lost bridges

Lost bridges

Minnesota has a robust engineering heritage, represented through its transit network carried over the state’s countless bodies of water by bridges. Sometimes, due to deterioration or transportation infrastructure updates, a historic bridge can no longer meet the functions of our current system and must be replaced. Those bridges that have been removed from our transportation system are presented here to aid in educational purposes, with information about the bridge’s historic significance, when it was removed, and any associated and relevant historic documentation on the structure.

Bridge 2628

Bridge 2628

History & significance

Bridge 2628 was a single-span, cast-in-place, concrete through girder structure constructed in 1917. It carried Township Road 187 over Okabena Creek in Alba Township in west-central Jackson County. The State of Minnesota's specifications for concrete girder highway crossings set the maximum span length at 60 feet, and several through girder bridges were built at this outer limit. Of these, Bridge 2628 was the only surviving example with a 60-foot main span length, and it was significant for this reason. Bridge 2628 displays monolithic construction where the concrete deck is carried by floor beams extending between the two girders, which also served as the parapet railings.

Bridge 2628 was removed in 2018.

Location

Alba Township (Jackson County)

Additional resources

Bridge 3130

Bridge 3130

History & significance

Bridge 3130 was a concrete girder bridge constructed in 1920. It carried Township Road 232 over Coon Creek about one-half-mile south of Blue Earth in rural southwestern Faribault County. The structure was significant as the best surviving, early example of the Minnesota Highway Department's standardized plan for concrete deck-girder bridges.

Bridge 3130 was removed in 2017.

Location

Blue Earth City Township (Faribault County)

Additional resources

Bridge 5380

Bridge 5380

The Lac Qui Parle Bridge (Bridge 5380) carried State Highway 40 over a widening in the Minnesota River known as Lac Qui Parle Lake about 3 miles southwest of Milan in northwestern Chippewa County. The lake is the result of a water conservation and flood control project initiated in the mid-1930s by the Works Progress Administration, under the sponsorship of the Minnesota Department of Conservation. The project created a 40-mile-long reservoir on the Minnesota River by building three dams, control works, and a diversion channel. The undertaking also required the construction of new roads and bridges, including the Lac Qui Parle Bridge.

Completed in 1938, the bridge was a single-span, riveted steel, Parker through truss with concrete slab approach spans. The bridge had poured concrete abutments with somewhat stylized classically inspired detailing, such as entablature-like molding, railing piers with recessed panels, and curving corbel-like forms that support the bridge approaches. Cantilevered sidewalks were incorporated into the design due to the bridge’s location near a popular fishing spot on the lake. The causeway at each end of the bridge is protected by large areas of well-crafted, mortared, hand-fit granite riprap. The bridge was significant as a contributing resource to the Lac Qui Parle Flood Control Historic District.

The bridge was removed in 2019.

Location

  • Kragero Township (Chippewa County)

Additional resources

Bridge 9065

Bridge 9065

History & significance

Built in 1958, Bridge 9065 carried southbound U.S. Highway 61 over Trout Creek in Winona County. The bridge was significant as an example of the earliest period of use and evolution for prestressed, post-tensioned concrete slab in the state. Prestressed concrete represents a significant advance in construction materials and was first used by the Minnesota Highway Department in 1957.

Bridge 9065 was removed in 2017.

Location

Richmond Township (Winona County)

Additional resources

Bridge 9103

Bridge 9103

History & significance

Constructed in 1960, Bridge 9103 carried U.S. Highway 63 over U.S. Highway 61/63 and a service drive in Goodhue County. The continuous concrete slab structure was a horizontally curved bridge with an exceptional structure length of 200 feet. The bridge was located in close proximity to downtown Red Wing and served as an approach to the Eisenhower Bridge, which spans the Mississippi River at the Wisconsin state line. These site considerations were a factor during the design of the bridge, demonstrating the importance of showing harmony with the bridge's surroundings. As a result, the bridge displayed artistic elements, such as an ornamental rail and curved form that illustrate the importance of design aesthetics.

Bridge 9103 was exceptionally long when compared to other continuous concrete slabs, illustrating a solution to a particular site challenge. The bridge was significant for exhibiting the combination of engineering features that demonstrates the complex design issues the engineers faced to meet the site challenges and road requirements for a bridge at this location.

Bridge 9103 was removed in 2018.

Location

City of Red Wing (Goodhue County)

Additional resources

Bridge 9177

Bridge 9177

History & significance

Built in 1958, Bridge 9177 carried 11th Drive over Interstate 90 in Mower County. The bridge was significant as an example of the earliest period of use and evolution for prestressed concrete girders in the state. Prestressed concrete represents a significant advance in construction materials and was first used by the Minnesota Highway Department in 1957.

Bridge 9177 was removed in 2017.

Location

City of Austin (Mower County)

Additional resources

Rainy River International Bridge (Bridge 9412)

Bridge 9412

History & significance

The Rainy River International Bridge carried State Highway 72 over the Rainy River at the Canadian border (Ontario Highway 11) in Baudette, Lake of the Woods County. The Pennsylvania through truss was constructed in 1959. It was significant as an international crossing. As the first bridge at this location, it was part of transportation initiatives by local proponents to connect Minnesota and Canada by providing an additional point of entry that relieved congestion at established border crossings, connected important market or industrial routes to Ontario, and expanded recreation and tourism. The Pennsylvania through truss is also significant as an uncommon bridge type in Minnesota.

Bridge 9412 was removed in 2019.

Location

City of Baudette (Lake of the Woods County)

Additional resources

Midtown Greenway Bridges

Bridge 90437, Bridge 90494, and Bridge L8901

Midtown greenway bridges

History & significance

In 1916 the Chicago, Milwaukee and Saint Paul Railroad constructed a series of bridges to separate railroad traffic from city streets. The bridges are identical in plan, dimension, and ornamental detail. Each structure is a three-span, cast-in-place, reinforced-concrete T-beam that rests on round-arch piers. The railings, parapet walls, and wingwalls feature modest Classic Revival details, including ornamental recessed panels and pilasters. Beginning in 2000 the rail lines were removed and the grade separated corridor was converted to a recreational trail, known as the Midtown Greenway, and maintained by the City of Minneapolis.

  • Bridges 90437 and 90494 were removed in 2017.
  • Bridge L8901 was removed in 2019.

Location

City of Minneapolis (Hennepin County)

Additional resources

Bridge 90592

bridge 90592

History & significance

Bridge 90592 was a c.1904 single-span, cast-in-place concrete arch bridge that carries 28th Avenue over Minnehaha Creek in the Minnehaha Parkway area of south Minneapolis. The structural arch and its headwalls and wingwalls were comprised of cast-in-place reinforced concrete. Bridge 90592 was significant as an example of the early use of reinforced concrete in Minnesota, and was also a contributing structure to the Grand Rounds Historic District.

Bridge 90592 was removed in 2019.

Location

City of Minneapolis (Hennepin County)

Additional resources

Bridge L4013

Bridge L4013

History & significance

Bridge L4013 was a single-span, semicircular stone-arch bridge constructed in 1915 to carry a single lane of vehicular traffic on Rooster Valley Road over a dry run in Houston County. The structural arch and stone headwalls/wingwalls were comprised of coursed-ashlar, buff-colored limestone. The bridge was significant as the only surviving, authenticated example of an early-twentieth-century, state-designed, stone-arch bridge.

Bridge L4013 was removed in 2016.

Location

Black Hammer Township (Houston County)

Additional resources